Summer

Extend the Season with Plant Cover-Ups

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Extend the growing season with a garden cloche, hoop house, or three season cold frame. Challenge your students to install a season extending structure and monitor plant growth.

For many school gardeners, the season is all too short. In much of the country, just as the danger of spring frost is over and gardens are beginning to thrive, school lets out for the year. On the other end, fall frosts limit the time students can explore their garden oasis. In warmer climates, intense heat and drought are limiting factors.

Back to School Basics

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Just for our KidsGardening.org readers, SAVE 20% through the month of September at GardeningWithKids.org — just use coupon code BACK2SCHOOL20 at checkout.

Please note that this offer excludes greenhouses and sheds.

It’s not too late in the season to install or expand your school garden. Encourage your new students to become engaged in the garden and lay the foundation for successful spring planting by trying some fun garden projects this fall. Inspire young gardeners to get involved at the beginning of the academic year by giving them hands-on opportunities to add to the garden. Getting involved in the school garden means much more than harvesting fall produce, raking leaves, and composting.

Plan Ahead: The Fall Garden

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It's not too late to plant the school garden! Plant edibles like lettuce, spinach, kale, and radishes for a fall harvest. Check out our Winter Garden Seed Collection

Gardening is often considered a spring or summer activity, but many plants grow beautifully in fall! Planted in late summer, a number of vegetables will grow to maturity -- even in northern areas -- and this is the best time of year to plant spring-flowering bulbs. Engaging children in the garden throughout the year strengthens their understanding of nature's cycles and deepens their love and respect for the environment.

Top 5 TODAY Show Garden Essentials

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Imagine creating your own version of Carson Daly's TODAY show garden! See the complete list at GardeningWithKids.org.  And just for our KidsGardening readers, SAVE 20% through the month of August on all TODAY show products--just use coupon code TODAY20 at checkout.
 
Please note that this offer excludes greenhouses and sheds. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annie's Teams up with KidsGardening.org and Carson Daly to Support TODAY Show Garden Initiative

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Join us by adding your donation today at Crowdrise.com/Carson.

Annie’s presents check on TODAY Show with Carson Daly to shine a light on childhood hunger and healthy eating in America

Carson Daly's TODAY Garden

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Help Carson Daly and KidsGardening.org plant a garden in every school. Donate Today!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Housed together in a four-story brown brick structure surrounded by brownstones and apartment buildings is PS 705 and Exceed Charter School of Brooklyn, New York. This combined school in the Crown Heights neighborhood has dedicated 1,000 square feet of their courtyard to an important cause: growing healthy food.

Butterfly Garden Essentials

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Make the most of your time in the garden! Gather your students to watch and record the metamorphosis of butterflies with our Butterfly Bundle


To create your own butterfly garden and help young minds grow, SAVE 20% through the month of July at GardeningWithKids.org using coupon code KGNPOLLINATOR20.

Please note, offer excludes sheds and greenhouses.

Observe the lifecycle of the butterfly with your own Painted Lady Caterpillars.

Welcome Caterpillars and Butterflies to your Schoolyard

Beneficial Insects: We Get By with a little Help from Our Friends

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What lives in your garden? Check out this free lesson that explores the garden as a habitat for pollinators, wildlife, and other living organisms. 

We can all use a little help in the garden. And the garden has an army of tiny helpers eager to lend a hand. They are the beneficial insects, ones that behave in ways that are helpful to the crops we grow. These “good bugs” help out in a variety of ways—by hunting and eating (or using as food for their young) insects that are harmful to our crops, by parasitizing insects we consider pests, or by pollinating the fruiting plants we grow.

Honeybees: Powerhouse Pollinators

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Learn how the typical flower entices pollinators and produces seeds by checking out Digging into Flowers and for a hands-on lesson, learn more about how pollinators interact with flowers by creating your own flower!

 

Download our Flower Anatomy worksheet 

When we have breakfast each day, we can thank honeybees for making our meal possible by pollinating the blueberries on our cereal, oranges for our juice, or almonds in our muffins.

Honeybees are powerhouse pollinators, the most important pollinators on the planet. In the United States, commercial beekeepers truck thousands of honeybee hives around the country to large-scale farms to pollinate 100 different crops. Apples, sunflowers (grown as a commercial crop for oil), carrots, broccoli, cantaloupes, cucumbers, and pumpkins are all reliant on honeybee pollination.

Planting for Pollinators: Construct an Herb Spiral Garden!

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Herbs offer a sensory experience, making them the perfect garden introduction for children. Sensory herbs recommended for children’s gardens include lemon balm, lavender, lamb’s ear and mint varieties. Focus on questions regarding how the plant looks, feels, smells and tastes.

Children and families can also explore the pollinators attracted to herbs as well as the nutritional benefits of herbs. Explore herbs with kids using this sensory worksheet.



Plant for Pollinators!
Attract beneficial pollinators by planting their favorite flowers. This chart will get you started!

We all know that a successful garden needs fertile soil, water, and sunshine to grow. But did you also know garden productivity relies upon the work of pollinators. Pollinators are beneficial wildlife species such as honey bees, hummingbirds and butterflies that transfer pollen between flowers to fertilize them.

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