Spring

Learning Takes Flight: A Passionate Pursuit of Monarchs

“I always look for interesting and relevant themes to hook students,” says fourth grade teacher Ruth Pinson from Armuchee Elementary School. But, she admits, she never imagined she’d cast her lot with insects, much less have their young crawling all over the classroom! Inspired by a workshop on raising monarchs, Ruth became hooked. “The idea of working with monarchs gave me such a shot of enthusiasm that I figured it would surely do the same for my students.”

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Join the Journey!

Learn more about Journey North and register to participate in one of its exciting migration studies or other seasonal adventures.

Ladybugs Lost and Found

A Tale of Schoolyard Citizen Science

Noelle Kramer hadn’t planned to delve into citizen science, but her students were rather persuasive. As her third and fourth graders in Dixon, California read aloud from Time for Kids, something sparked their interest. “An article on a citizen science program called The Lost Ladybug Project asked kids to become ladybug spotters in order to help scientists find a native species that had nearly disappeared,” says Noelle.

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The Tale of the Lost Ladybugs

Once the state insect of New York, the nine-spotted ladybug population diminished until it all but disappeared from the radar. In fact when some youngsters spotted one of them near their Virginia home in 2006, it was the first of that species seen in the Eastern United States in 14 years! John Losey and other scientists at Cornell University figured that if lots of eyes scoured the country, they might help find more of them along with some other native lady beetles that were also disappearing. And so, the Lost Ladybug Project was born. But it wasn’t just about documenting locals. Scientists – and many homeowners – noticed that populations of other ladybugs were exploding. This included the orangey Asian lady beetle, which was introduced in this country to control pests. Have these imports excluded the native species from their habitats? This is one of the questions that scientists are exploring, thanks to a growing team of citizen scientists.

Responsibility 101

Teaching Life Skills through a Youth Garden Business

Vocational agriculture teacher Rose Ormsby-Krueger (North Hollywood, California) uses a cut flower garden and farmers’ market enterprise to teach North Hollywood High School students valuable life skills. “Flowers don’t tell you they’re hungry every day, but they tell you they’re thirsty,” she says. “It takes responsibility to make sure they get watered and taken care of.”

Growing Food for Others

Growing an edible family garden is a great way to get your kids excited about eating fresh fruits and vegetables. It also provides a terrific opportunity to give back to your community.

Cut Flower Lesson Ideas

Growing flowers helps teach kids many art, language, language arts, math, and science concepts—along with patience, responsibility, and appreciation for the natural world. Below are some lesson ideas we really like.

First Lady Michelle Obama Really Digs Kids Gardening

NGA President Mike Metallo Remembers Kitchen Garden Season Kick-Off

Mike Metallo, NGA President and Michelle Obama working with the children in the gardenI'm sitting in Reagan National Airport waiting for my flight and thinking back on the events of the White House Kitchen Garden Season Kick-Off. It was a once-in-a-lifetime day.

Students Tune into a Music Garden

Exploring Found Sounds and Natural Rhythms

Five years ago, Helen Krofchick’s music students in Lugoff, SC, could be found tapping on old cans and rubbing sticks. Why? Inspired by a visiting artist and video clips of a group called STOMP*, the K-5 classes tried using “found” objects, including things from the environment, to create and perform unique sounds and rhythms. After loads of inside practice, they wondered what their inventive instruments would sound like if they played them in the schoolyard.

Throw a Garden Birthday Party

What better way to celebrate your child’s spring or summer birthday than with a garden party? Although fancy dresses and tea sandwiches may come to mind, kids love to run around outside, play games and get their hands into the dirt-- all fun activities to keep them engaged and maybe even learn a little about the wonders of plants and seeds. Here are ideas for invitations, decorations, activities, refreshments and favors that will make your child’s big day a memorable one.

Learning about Bee Lives and Hives

When children arrive at the Krystal Garden in the Bronx, they find Jennifer Plewka waiting for them wearing her beekeeper’s suit and holding a large, inflatable bee.

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